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Laws And Regulations

Laws And Regulations

It is important to understand the laws and regulations associated with Marijuana Law. See the pages below for more information:

FLORIDA

Understanding Florida Marijuana Law: Current Laws and Expected Changes

On November 8, 2016, over 6.5 million Florida voters overwhelmingly passed a constitutional amendment to legalize medical marijuana. This ballot initiative was referred to as Amendment 2. Florida’s new medical marijuana law is an actual amendment to the Florida constitution. Thus, the right to access medical marijuana in Florida will now be significantly better than if the legislature simply implemented limited laws in favor of medical cannabis use. Specifically, the passage of Amendment 2 now allows for individuals suffering from the following conditions to have a legal (and constitutional) right to use marijuana for the following purposes: cancer, epilepsy, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis. In addition, the Amendment 2 allows Florida licensed physicians to certify patients for medical marijuana use after diagnosing them with some “other debilitating medical conditions of the same kind or class as or comparable to those enumerated.” However, before amendment 2 passed, Florida had already implemented limited medical marijuana laws that were commonly referred to as Charlotte’s Web. Charlotte’s Web is famous throughout the United States these days, and for more than just the popular children’s book. The name now refers to a specific strain of medical marijuana that is high in the medicinal component of cannabidiol (CBD) but low in THC, the compound that produces the drug’s euphoric high.

Useful in treating certain illnesses and conditions like seizures, cancer and Crohn’s disease, this marijuana strain was first developed for a little girl named Charlotte Figi. Doctors were unable to treat her extreme epileptic seizures through traditional medical means, until she found dramatic relief through medical marijuana.

The pot strain called Charlotte’s Web was developed specifically for use by children and other patients in need of pot’s medical benefits, since its low levels of THC combined with high levels of CBD give it a big medicinal punch with a minimal high. Since the brand name “Charlotte’s Web” is now used generally to refer to all high-CBD, low-THC strains of marijuana, medical marijuana laws throughout the country are often referred to as Charlotte’s Web laws.

The Compassionate Medical Cannabis Act of 2014 was Florida’s own Charlotte’s Web law, passed in the spring of 2014. Under this law, authorized Florida physicians will be able to begin prescribing medical marijuana in oil or vapor form beginning on January 1, 2015. The marijuana will be sold through dispensaries that are licensed and regulated by the Florida Department of Health.

Previously before the passage of amendment 2, Florida medical marijuana laws provided for doctors to recommend medical marijuana to treat only cancer and seizure disorders, and for only five marijuana dispensaries to open in January 2015. However, the overwhelming majority of Florida voters — 82%, according to a November 2013 Quinnipiac University poll, including Republicans, Democrats and Independents — support medical marijuana. Based on this enormous public support for legalizing medical cannabis, experts predicted that in November 2016, Florida voters would pass amendment 2, and they did. Now, with the legalization of medical marijuana via a Florida state constitutional amendment, medical marijuana is available for treating a broader range of conditions.

Numerous research studies, after all, have found cannabis to be highly effective in treating many different illnesses and conditions, such as glaucoma, Lou Gehrig’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, extreme nausea, and chronic pain, Crohn’s disease, intestinal issues, and many other medical conditions. But while public support for legalizing medical marijuana is high in Florida, including among Conservatives, Amendment 2 still had some vocal opponents. Their chief concerns are that the bill does not provide for proper research or clinical trials, and that broadening the number of conditions legally treatable with medical marijuana could be a “slippery slope” that eventually leads to legalizing marijuana for recreational use.

Still, the newly implemented laws have plenty of support, not just from Florida residents, but also from numerous public figures, Florida advocacy groups like FloridaMarijuanaInfo.Org, and national associations like the American Public Health Association and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

Whatever Florida voters decide in November, the federal ban on the use, possession, sale or purchase of marijuana will remain in place. If you have any questions regarding Florida marijuana laws or federal marijuana laws, contact the medical marijuana lawyers and professionals at the Shiner Law Group, a Florida Marijuana Business Law Firm, at 561-777-7700 or 1-844-WEED-LAW (1-844-933-3529).

WASHINGTON STATE

History of Marijuana Legalization in Washington State

Marijuana law is changing throughout the United States as support for marijuana legalization spreads rapidly. Though pot is still under federal ban due to its classification as a Schedule I drug, nearly half of all states in the U.S. have either decriminalized marijuana or legalized it for medical or general use.

November 2012 marked a major point on the legalization timeline as residents of Washington State voted to allow the recreational use of cannabis for adults age 21 and over. In so doing, these voters made history, positioning Washington as one of the first two states, along with Colorado, to legalize weed for recreational purposes.

It took cannabis lawyers in Washington nearly two years to determine the details regarding marijuana rules, regulations and licensing. Finally, in July 2014, Washington’s first licensed marijuana shops opened their doors for business, six months after Colorado’s first legal pot shops opened in January 2014. Washington’s four licensed marijuana dealers, located in the cities of Spokane, Seattle and Bellingham and the small farming town of Prosser, are selling government-regulated pot that has been tested for impurities. This legal marijuana carries a 25% sales tax, the majority of which has been earmarked for substance abuse research, education and prevention.

This change in Washington’s marijuana law comes after nearly fifty years of efforts to decriminalize and, ultimately, legalize marijuana for personal and medical use in the United States — but many Americans don’t realize that marijuana was not always illegal in this country.

In fact, it was a legal substance commonly used throughout the U.S. for medical as well as recreational purposes until 1911, when Massachusetts became the first state to ban cannabis. In 1937, President Roosevelt enacted a federal ban on the use, production and sale of marijuana. By the mid-1940s, U.S. doctors were no longer permitted to prescribe marijuana or cannabis-derived medical products to patients. The first protests against cannabis prohibition laws came in the 1960s, and by the end of that decade, President Nixon created the Shafer Commission, a group tasked with reviewing existing marijuana laws. Shortly thereafter, in 1970, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) was founded in Washington, D.C.

Though the Shafer Commission recommended in 1972 that the personal cultivation and use of marijuana should be decriminalized, President Nixon and the U.S. Congress rejected the commission’s findings. Still, NORML used the commission’s recommendations to encourage the adoption of cannabis decriminalization laws in all fifty states. The next year, in 1973, Oregon became the first state to decriminalize marijuana. Fast-forwarding thirty years to 2003, when marijuana was still illegal in the state of Washington, voters in Seattle approved a change to their city’s municipal code that made the investigation, arrest and prosecution of personal-use marijuana offenses the lowest law enforcement priority for the Seattle Police Department and the City Attorney’s Office. For the next decade, decriminalization and medical marijuana initiatives spread throughout the state and the country, until Washington and Colorado finally became the first two states to legalize pot for recreational use in 2012.

Seattle City Attorney and cannabis lawyer Pete Holmes, who was a primary sponsor of Initiative 502 to legalize, regulate and tax marijuana, was reported to be third in line to purchase weed at Seattle’s first legal pot shop on July 8, 2014. Hundreds of interested buyers lined up outside all four of Washington’s licensed marijuana shops that day — so many, in fact, that the government-regulated supply ran out quickly. More legal pot shops are poised to open in Washington State, just as soon as there is more marijuana to sell.

According to the Pew Research Center, the majority of Americans no longer support the prohibition of marijuana, and an overwhelming majority support the legalization of marijuana for medical use. In July 2014, the New York Times placed the issue of marijuana legalization squarely in the national spotlight by running a feature on repealing marijuana prohibition. The Times stated its official position thusly: “The federal government should repeal the ban on marijuana.”

With such a major news outlet supporting pot legalization along with the majority of American citizens, more states are sure to follow in Washington’s footsteps in the years to come.

For more information about the history of marijuana legalization in the United States, for any inquiry related to cannabis laws, or if you simply need a lawyer, contact the medical marijuana lawyers and professionals at the Shiner Law Group, a Florida Marijuana Business Law Firm, at 561-777-7700 or 1-844-WEED-LAW (1-844-933-3529).

Marijuana Businesses in Washington State: License Types, Rules and Regulations

This historic vote in November 2012 made Washington, along with Colorado, one of the first two states in the U.S. to legalize marijuana for general use. Customers who purchase marijuana at Washington pot shops pay a 25% sales tax on government-regulated cannabis, cannabis products and paraphernalia. Most the revenue generated by pot sales has been earmarked for substance abuse research, education and prevention.

Any business in Washington State that is involved with producing, processing or selling marijuana is required by law to obtain a marijuana license. According to the Washington State Liquor Control Board, these licenses are endorsements on Business Licenses that are issued by the Washington State Department of Revenue. The first month-long application window for business owners to apply for marijuana licenses was from November 18 through December 20, 2013.

Purchasing Marijuana Legally in Washington State: Rules and Information

In November 2012, Washington State voters passed Initiative 502, making marijuana law history as they made recreational marijuana legal in the state. July 2014 saw the opening of the first four legal “pot shops” — licensed retail stores selling cannabis that has been government tested and regulated. Now consumers who are at least 21 years of age can purchase marijuana in much the same way they purchase alcohol. Medical marijuana has been legal in the state since 1998, when voters passed Initiative 692, legalizing the possession, cultivation and use of weed for medical marijuana patients.

Can I purchase pot in Washington State?

If you are at least 21 years old, you can purchase weed for recreational use in Washington. This includes Washington residents as well as visitors from out of state; however, all pot must be consumed in Washington and cannot be taken across state borders, since marijuana is still illegal in bordering states.

How do I buy weed in Washington State?

As of July 8, 2014, pot was available for purchase in Washington at four retail stores located in Spokane, Seattle, Bellington and Prosser. Though the Washington State Liquor Control Board has issued licenses to many more retailers, there has been a widespread shortage of legal pot for retailers to sell, and actual pot shops in operation are still few in number. Furthermore, it is not legal to sell marijuana through the Internet or via delivery service. Rather, customers can purchase marijuana by visiting one of the pot shops currently in operation. Be sure to bring cash, since these businesses can’t accept credit cards due to federal banking regulations. Prices, which include a 25% state tax, range from $12 per gram to $25 per gram.

How much pot can I buy at one time?

According to Washington State law, you can purchase and possess up to one ounce (28 grams) of weed at any one time for recreational use.

Can I smoke pot in public?

No. Currently, it is illegal to smoke weed in public places in the state of Washington, and that includes the pot shops where marijuana is sold. It is also illegal to drive under the influence of marijuana (just as it is to drive under the influence of alcohol and other intoxicating substances). Out-of-state visitors can seek hotels with designated smoking rooms; note that only 25% of all Washington hotel rooms may be designated marijuana smoking rooms, so be sure to call ahead.

What about medical marijuana in Washington State?

Medical marijuana is legal in Washington for any patient with a qualifying medical condition who has a doctor’s written recommendation. A qualifying medical condition is one that is diagnosed and documented by a licensed medical doctor, physician’s assistant, advanced registered nurse practitioner (RN), or naturopath; and that is deemed debilitating to the patient.

What conditions and illnesses are qualifying medical conditions?

Medical conditions that qualify a patient for medical cannabis include cancer, Crohn’s disease, epilepsy, glaucoma, Hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis, nausea and seizures. Other conditions can also be qualifying conditions with the approval of one of the healthcare professionals listed above.

How do I get a prescription for medical marijuana from my doctor?

If you have a qualifying medical condition, speak to your doctor about getting a recommendation for medical marijuana. You do not need to register with the state of Washington as a medical marijuana patient; all you need is the valid written recommendation from your doctor (or physician’s assistant, RN, or naturopath).

How do I get pot as a medical marijuana patient in Washington?

Under both state and federal law, it is illegal in Washington to purchase, possess or sell medical marijuana. However, according to the Washington Department of Health, Washington provides an affirmative defense to criminal prosecution for qualified patients who possess up to 24 ounces of useable marijuana or up to 15 marijuana plants. If you are a medical marijuana patient, you have the option of purchasing pot for medical use from one of the licensed pot retailers selling cannabis for recreational use.

How much pot can I grow or possess as a medical marijuana patient in Washington?

Medical marijuana patients in Washington can possess up to 24 ounces of useable pot (meaning, the dried flowers, buds and leaves of a cannabis plant), or you may cultivate up to 15 marijuana plants at home. Patients may also designate, in writing, a caregiver — an individual who is at least 18 years old and who will supply the patient with their medical marijuana.

I need a lawyer with experience in cannabis law. How do I find a pot lawyer?

If you need the help of experienced medical cannabis lawyers, contact the Florida Marijuana Business Law Firm by calling 561-368-3363 or visiting www.NationalCannabisLawFirm.com. For more information on recreational marijuana in Washington State, marijuana law, or related issues, visit the Washington Department of Health website at www.doh.wa.gov.

MICHIGAN

History of Marijuana Legalization in Michigan

In November 2013, Lansing, Jackson and Ferndale joined a growing list of Michigan cities in which voters have made major changes to marijuana law by approving ordinances decriminalizing the personal use and possession of small amounts of marijuana. The medical use of marijuana was approved by 63 percent of Michigan voters in 2008, making this the 13th state in the U.S. to legalize medical cannabis.

The recreational use of marijuana is still illegal under both Michigan state and federal law, as pot remains federally classified as a Schedule I drug, meaning it has “no currently accepted medical use” according to the Controlled Substances Act. (For further information on cannabis laws, contact the Florida Marijuana Business Law Firm at 561-368-3363, or visit www.NationalCannabisLawFirm.com. Our experienced and knowledgeable cannabis lawyers can provide you with the law help you need.)

Still, enforcing laws against the recreational use of marijuana is now a low priority for law enforcement in eight Michigan cities, including Detroit, Grand Rapids, Flint and Ypsilanti, all of which passed decriminalization measures in 2012. In fact, in the early 1970s, Ann Arbor became the first Michigan city to decriminalize marijuana when voters passed an ordinance to make cannabis possession merely a civil infraction rather than a misdemeanor or felony.

Now, in Ann Arbor and the other Michigan cities that have decriminalized marijuana, individuals may cultivate and possesses up to an ounce of pot as long as it is for personal use and on private property. Per the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act that was passed in 2008 and enacted in 2009, Michigan residents who qualify for medical marijuana may possess more than double that amount — up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana or up to 12 marijuana plants.

A majority of voters in the state, including conservative voters and lawmakers, support the legalization of cannabis for general use. In fact, a “pot for potholes” plan was approved in 2013 by conservative lawmakers who support legalizing, regulating and taxing the sale of weed, and using that tax revenue to fix Michigan roads.

The decriminalization and legalization of cannabis in the United States has been a long and winding road. As of 2014, nearly half of all states in the U.S., plus Washington, D.C., have either decriminalized marijuana or legalized it for medical or general use. In 2012, Washington and Colorado became the first two states to legalize marijuana for general purposes, including recreational use.

Weed, however, has not always been illegal in the United States. In fact, the federal ban on the use, sale, production and possession of marijuana came about less than eight decades ago, in 1937, under President Franklin Roosevelt. Restrictions tightened further during the following decade, when physicians were prohibited from prescribing cannabis or cannabis-derived products to their patients, despite the substance’s long history of documented medical uses.

In the 1960s, protestors throughout the country rallied against marijuana prohibition laws. President Nixon formed the Shafer Commission in 1969 to conduct a thorough review of existing cannabis laws, but ultimately rejected the commission’s 1972 findings that the personal cultivation and use of pot should be decriminalized. Still, the momentum of years of pro-marijuana activism was building, and in 1973, Oregon became the first state to decriminalize pot since the initial federal ban nearly forty years earlier.

As of this year, the majority of U.S. voters — liberal, conservative and independent alike — support the legalization of marijuana for medical use, and a growing number support its general legalization. Still, repeated efforts to remove cannabis from the federal list of Schedule I drugs have failed. Many lawmakers and politicians agree, however, that it is only a matter of time before pot is removed from the list of Schedule I drugs under the Controlled Substances Act and legalized throughout the United States.

Starting with Ann Arbor’s decriminalization of marijuana in the early 1970s and its liberal attitude toward marijuana for medical and recreational use, Michigan has been a frontrunner in this country’s shifting cannabis laws. Currently, nearly 50 percent of Michigan voters support taxing and regulating pot like alcohol. Some Michigan marijuana activists predict that pot will be legal statewide by the year 2016, if not sooner. For now, a growing number of Michigan municipalities have approved cannabis decriminalization. It appears likely that full legalization will soon follow.

For more information about Michigan’s marijuana laws, contact the medical marijuana lawyers and professionals at the Shiner Law Group, a Florida Marijuana Business Law Firm, at 561-777-7700 or 1-844-WEED-LAW (1-844-933-3529).

Medical Marijuana in Michigan Rules and Requirements for Physicians and Primary Caregivers

In 2008, Michigan became the 13th state in the U.S. to legalize medical marijuana when 63 percent of its voters passed the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act (MMMA), approving pot for medical use.

(In Michigan state law, marijuana is spelled with an “h” — marihuana — rather than a “j,” because “marihuana” is one of two acceptable spellings in the dictionary and is consistent with the spelling in the Michigan Public Health Code, Act 368 of 1978, and Initiated Law 1 of 2008. This article, however, will use the more common spelling of marijuana, with a “j” rather than an “h.”)

The recreational use of cannabis is still illegal in Michigan, although as of 2014, eight Michigan cities — Ann Arbor, Detroit, Ferndale, Flint, Grand Rapids, Jackson, Lansing and Ypsilanti — have decriminalized recreational marijuana in small amounts for personal use. The federal ban on marijuana, of course, is still in effect. Cannabis remains federally classified as a Schedule I drug, one that, according to the Controlled Substances Act, has “no currently accepted medical use.”

Despite the federal government’s continued refusal to recognize legitimate medical uses for cannabis, the majority of Americans as well as many medical doctors believe that pot can be a useful tool in treating debilitating medical conditions such as cancer, glaucoma, Crohn’s disease and seizures. In Michigan, doctors don’t prescribe medical marijuana to qualifying patients (patients with a diagnosed and documented debilitating medical condition). Rather, Michigan doctors can sign a physician certification for a qualifying patient to use medical marijuana. That patient can then submit their certification along with other required paperwork to the Michigan Department of Community Health in order to register with the state of Michigan as a medical marijuana patient.

Currently, there is no place to legally purchase medical marijuana in Michigan. Once a patient’s application has been accepted, that patient can obtain medical marijuana either by growing up to 12 marijuana plants for their own use, or by designating a primary caregiver to grow plants for them.

Rules and Requirements for Michigan Doctors

There are two types of doctor who may complete and sign the physician certification for a qualifying patient to use medical marijuana in Michigan: Medical Doctors (MDs) or Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery (DOs) who are fully licensed in the state of Michigan. Furthermore, in order to complete the medical marijuana physician certification for a patient, a doctor must have a “bona fide physician-patient relationship.” This consists of the following:

  • The doctor has fully assessed the patient’s current medical condition along with their complete medical history.
  • The doctor has created and maintained the patient’s medical records according to medically accepted standards.
  • The doctor plans to provide follow-up care to the patient to assess the success of the medical marijuana in treating the patient’s debilitating medical condition.
  • If the doctor has the patient’s permission to do so, he or she must notify the patient’s primary care physician of the patient’s debilitating medical condition and certification for the use of medical marijuana to treat that condition.

Protections for Michigan Physicians

Michigan state law protects doctors from being arrested, prosecuted or penalized in any way for discussing medical marijuana with a patient, or for completing the physician certification for a patient to use medical marijuana. Michigan doctors are further protected by state law from any related disciplinary action from the Board of Medicine or the Board of Osteopathic Medicine.

Rules and Requirements for Primary Caregivers

In the state of Michigan, a primary caregiver is a Michigan resident who is at least 21 years old who has agreed to grow pot plants for a medical marijuana patient. One is not allowed to become a primary caregiver if one has ever been convicted of a felony involving illegal drugs or an assaultive crime (such as kidnapping or attempted murder), or if one has been convicted of any type of felony within the past 10 years.

In order to become a primary caregiver, one must be designated as such on a medical marijuana patient’s application to the Michigan Department of Community Health, and must submit a completed Caregiver Attestation along with the patient’s application. Primary caregivers may be designated by up to five qualifying patients at one time, and may possess up to 2.5 ounces of usable marijuana or 12 pot plants for each qualifying patient.

According to Section 4(e) of the MMMA, while primary caregivers may not sell cannabis to their qualifying patients, they are allowed to work out a private agreement with their patients regarding monetary compensation for the costs associated with assisting the patient in the medical use of marijuana.

Primary caregivers may not use the marijuana in their possession for their own, personal use, but they are allowed to be both a medical marijuana patient and a primary caregiver at the same time.

Further Information

For more information on rules and requirements regarding medical marijuana law in Michigan, visit the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs at www.michigan.gov/lara. For more information on cannabis laws in Michigan or the U.S., or if you need the help of experienced medical cannabis lawyers, contact the Florida Marijuana Business Law Firm by calling 844-WEED-LAW (1-844-933-3529) or visiting www.844WEEDLAW.com.

Becoming a Medical Marijuana Patient in Michigan: Rules and Information

Michigan is among the leaders in changing medical cannabis laws in the United States. While the federal ban on cannabis is still in place, as pot is still classified as a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act, medical marijuana became legal in Michigan in 2008 under the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act (MMMA). (Note that in Michigan state law, marijuana is spelled with an “h” — marihuana — but this article will use the more common spelling of marijuana, with a “j.”)

The MMMA states that the people of Michigan agree with the findings of modern medical research regarding marijuana, namely that there are beneficial uses for marijuana in treating a variety of medical conditions, or for alleviating the symptoms associated with those conditions. The MMMA provides for Michigan residents who are qualifying patients to register as medical marijuana patients with the state so they can use cannabis to treat their qualifying medical conditions.

What is a qualifying patient, and how do I become one?

A qualifying patient is a patient who is a Michigan resident and has a diagnosed and documented medical condition that is considered to be debilitating.

In order to become a qualifying patient, you must be treated by a doctor at least three times for your qualifying medical condition, and your doctor must keep records of your illness that are up to current medical standards. This ensures that your illness is adequately documented for purposes of qualifying for medical marijuana.

What is a debilitating medical condition, and which medical conditions are eligible to be treated with medical marijuana under Michigan state law?

A debilitating medical condition is defined under the MMMA as a chronic or debilitating condition or disease that produces severe nausea; wasting syndrome; severe chronic pain; severe, persistent muscle spasms; and/or seizures. Specific medical conditions that qualify as debilitating conditions include AIDS, cancer, Crohn’s disease, glaucoma, Hepatitis C and HIV.

How do I get a prescription for medical marijuana from my doctor?

In Michigan, doctors do not prescribe weed to qualifying patients. Rather, they fill out and sign a physician certification for a qualifying patient, stating that patient can use medical marijuana to treat a certain, particular illness. Any physician who is a fully licensed Medical Doctor (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery (DO) can complete a physician certification for their patient.

Once a patient has obtained a physician certification for medical marijuana, they must submit it along with all applicable paperwork and the application fee to the Michigan Department of Community Health in order to register with the state of Michigan as a medical marijuana patient.

How do I obtain marijuana for medical use?

Currently, medical marijuana patients in Michigan cannot legally purchase weed for medical use. In order to obtain marijuana for medical use, you must either grow your own plants or designate a primary caregiver on your application to register as a medical marijuana patient. Once your application is accepted, you can begin growing pot plants or receiving pot from your designated caregiver.

What is a primary caregiver?

A primary caregiver is someone who has agreed to grow pot plants for a medical marijuana patient, or to obtain marijuana for that patient’s use. Primary caregivers must be Michigan residents and must be at least 21 years of age. If they have been convicted of any felony in the past 10 years, or if they have ever been convicted of a felony involving either illegal drugs or an assaultive crime, they are not allowed to become a primary caregiver.

How much pot can I grow, possess, or obtain from my caregiver?

A medical marijuana patient is allowed to possess up to 2.5 ounces of useable pot (meaning the dried buds, flowers and leaves of a marijuana plant), and also to grow up to 12 pot plants for personal medical use. Alternatively, they can choose to designate a primary caregiver who may possess the same amounts — up to 2.5 ounces of useable pot and up to 12 plants — on their behalf.

How do I find a medical marijuana doctor?

A good place to start is your own primary care physician, assuming you make regular visits to an MD or DO for physicals and to treat your medical condition. You can ask your doctor if they will complete and sign a physician certification for you. If they will not agree to sign a certification but you believe you do have a qualifying illness that merits the use of medical marijuana, you can seek another doctor who will complete the necessary certification.

Note that for a physician to complete a certification for you, they must have a “bona fide physician-patient relationship” with you, which is defined by the following:

  • The doctor has made a thorough assessment of your current medical condition as well as your complete medical history.
  • The doctor has created and maintained your medical records according to medically accepted standards.
  • The doctor plans to provide follow-up care to evaluate whether the use of medical marijuana has helped in treating your debilitating medical condition.
  • If the doctor is not your primary care physician, and if you give the doctor your permission to do so, he or she must notify your primary care physician about your debilitating medical condition and the physician certification for you to obtain medical marijuana.

If you reach a point when you are no longer suffering from your debilitating medical condition, your doctor may cancel their medical marijuana certification with written notification to the Michigan Department of Community Health.

I need a lawyer with experience in cannabis law. How do I find a pot lawyer?

If you need the help of experienced medical cannabis lawyers, contact the Florida Marijuana Business Law Firm by calling 561-777-7700 or visiting www.844WEEDLAW.com.

For more information on medical marijuana in Michigan, marijuana law, or related issues, visit the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs website at www.michigan.gov/lara.

To learn more, contact us: Call the National Cannabis Law Firm at 844-WEED-LAW, day or night. We have bilingual staff and attorneys available to talk anytime, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Note that, despite medical and recreational marijuana being legalized in many states, the use, possession, sale or purchase of marijuana is still illegal under federal law. Contact our attorneys with any questions you may have regarding state or federal marijuana law.